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May 16, 2014

Last week you may remember news that scientists have discovered that a big chunk of the West Antarctica ice sheet has been irrevocably destabilized. It's going to slowly melt into the ocean, raising worldwide sea levels by about four feet over the next decades and centuries. If the whole sheet goes, it would raise sea levels by about 10-13 feet.

So folks over at Climate Central handed data they had collected about coastal mapping to an artist named Nickolay Lamm, who made some amazingly realistic pictures (published below with permission) of what famous cities would look like if the sea level rose by 12 feet.

Here's the Jefferson Memorial:

Here's Ocean Drive in Miami:

Here's AT&T Park in San Francisco:

Start practicing your sandbag shoveling! For the rest, head over to Climate Central. Ryan Cooper

4:04 p.m. ET

Hillary Clinton highlighted just how extreme Donald Trump is in a speech in Reno, Nevada, on Thursday, pointing to the Republican presidential nominee's embrace of "discredited conspiracy theories," his "steady stream of bigotry," and his campaign's use of "prejudice and paranoia." Although Trump may be attempting to reposition himself as a more moderate candidate via "some new people putting new words in his mouth," Clinton insisted that we already "know who Trump is."

She then pulled out an old Mexican proverb as evidence: "'Tell me with whom you walk, and I will tell you who you are.'" Trump, Clinton said, is essentially walking with "hate groups," whose support he hesitates to disavow, and with a campaign CEO who has published headlines praising the Confederate flag.

In her appeal to the center-right, Clinton urged voters — no matter what political party they may belong to — to realize this election is about "who we are as a nation." "If he doesn't respect all Americans," Clinton said of Trump, "how can he serve all Americans?" Becca Stanek

3:34 p.m. ET
TIM CLARY/AFP/Getty Images

When her husband assumed the presidency in 1993, first lady Hillary Clinton faced a lot of criticism for taking on a public, policy-based role when she headed up the push to make health care universal. Nine days before Bill Clinton was sworn in as the 42nd president, in fact, the first lady-elect was already sitting in on meetings regarding health-care reform. But according to one former Clinton adviser cited in a comprehensive Washington Post article on Hillary's failed health-care push, "health-care task force leader" was not initially the front-facing title Hillary wanted in her husband's administration:

Dick Morris, a former Clinton adviser who is now a critic, said the idea [to lead a health-care task force] emerged from "a whole series of phone calls and a meeting at the governor's mansion" with [Hillary]. He said she first proposed becoming White House chief of staff — an idea Morris said he discouraged. She pondered attorney general or secretary of education, he said. Morris suggested she consider leading an important task force that would boost "her own credentials and her own accomplishments," he said. [The Washington Post]

The Post notes that Clinton recounted events differently in her 2003 autobiography Living History, where she says "Bill first broached the idea" of her leading the health-care task force. The story delves deep into how Hillary's first major government project crumbled beneath her — including how it led to the first time she ever had to wear a bulletproof vest. Read the whole extensive report at The Washington Post. Kimberly Alters

3:00 p.m. ET

In a speech delivered less than an hour ahead of Hillary Clinton's Thursday appearance in Reno, Nevada — during which she is expected to attack Donald Trump as an "alt-right candidate" — Trump served up some criticism of his own for his election rival. During a rally in Manchester, New Hampshire, Trump tore into the allegedly close ties between the Clinton Foundation and the State Department while Clinton was secretary of state, dubbing the relationship between the two organizations "one of the most shocking political scandals." "It's Watergate all over again," Trump said. "And she's being totally protected by our government."

Trump accused Clinton of giving "favorable treatment" to people who had donated to the Clinton Foundation, or who had given money to her husband, former President Bill Clinton. "Hillary Clinton ran the State Department like a personal hedge fund," Trump said, describing the lines between the two organizations as so blurred that it's "hard to tell where the Clinton Foundation ends and where the State Department begins."

Watch Trump's takedown, below. Becca Stanek

12:18 p.m. ET

The National Park Service is celebrating its centennial Thursday, having spent its first 100 years dedicated to preserving "unimpaired the natural and cultural resources and values" of America's national parks. The first National Park was actually designated in 1871, and President Ulysses S. Grant signed the corresponding legislation in 1872 to preserve Yellowstone National Park. But the current iteration of the NPS was established by President Woodrow Wilson "to conserve the scenery and the natural and historic objects and ... wildlife therein" on Aug. 25, 1916:

Last year, more than 300 million people visited National Parks, and in honor of its 100th anniversary the NPS is offering free admission to all 412 parks from Aug. 25-28. Can't make it to a park this weekend? Read up on why National Parks are known as "America's best idea" here, or check out this animated tour of some of the sights and sounds from the nation's best parks, courtesy of Google, below. Kimberly Alters

12:06 p.m. ET

For a second there, long-shot independent candidate Evan McMullin seemed to have a better chance of winning Minnesota than Republican nominee Donald Trump. That's because while McMullin, a former CIA agent positioning himself as a Trump alternative for conservatives this fall, only launched his independent presidential run earlier this month, he had at least secured a spot on the ballot in Minnesota. As of Thursday morning, however, Trump had not:

A Minnesota state official has already said the issue is being sorted out, and Trump's name will in fact appear on the ballot. "We just received the last item [of Trump's paperwork]," said Ryan Furlong, communications director for the Minnesota Secretary of State. "We were waiting for a pledge from one of the alternate electors. The filing is complete and the Republican ticket should be listed on our site shortly."

Minnesota's filing deadline is Monday, Aug. 29. Election Day is Nov. 8. Becca Stanek

11:33 a.m. ET
Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Hillary Clinton will attempt to turn attention away from her email troubles this week, by using a speech in Reno, Nevada, to remind center-right voters that Donald Trump is nowhere near as moderate as he is claiming to be. Rather, Clinton will point out, Trump is moving further toward the "alt-right," as evidenced by his recent hiring of Breitbart News' Steve Bannon as campaign CEO and his decision to retain Roger Ailes and Roger Stone as consultants.

"We intend to call out this 'alt-right' shift and the divisive and dystopian vision of America they put forth, because it tells voters everything they need to know about Donald Trump himself," Clinton campaign chairman John Podesta told Politico. "Republicans up and down the ticket are going to have to choose whether they want to be complicit in this lurch toward extremism or stand with the voters who can't stomach it."

Clinton's speech courting center-right voters comes as Trump angles to poach the Democratic nominee's support from African-American voters. Clinton has had a particularly contentious week, following the release of more of her emails in addition to Trump's calls for a special prosecutor to investigate improper conduct at the Clinton Foundation. Becca Stanek

10:39 a.m. ET

Trump campaign spokesperson Katrina Pierson put a truly remarkable spin on claims Donald Trump has changed his stance on immigration. While Trump's recent remark that he would "work with" undocumented immigrants and consider letting some stay in the U.S., instead of deporting all 11 million as he previously pledged to do, may sound like a major shift in policy, Pierson insisted that wasn't the case. "He hasn't changed his immigration position," Pierson said on CNN's Correct the Record. "He has changed the words he is saying."

That's certainly one way to look at it! Take a listen, below. Becca Stanek

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