Great news for the hip wader industry
May 16, 2014

Last week you may remember news that scientists have discovered that a big chunk of the West Antarctica ice sheet has been irrevocably destabilized. It's going to slowly melt into the ocean, raising worldwide sea levels by about four feet over the next decades and centuries. If the whole sheet goes, it would raise sea levels by about 10-13 feet.

So folks over at Climate Central handed data they had collected about coastal mapping to an artist named Nickolay Lamm, who made some amazingly realistic pictures (published below with permission) of what famous cities would look like if the sea level rose by 12 feet.

Here's the Jefferson Memorial:

Here's Ocean Drive in Miami:

Here's AT&T Park in San Francisco:

Start practicing your sandbag shoveling! For the rest, head over to Climate Central. Ryan Cooper

Discoveries
10:25 a.m. ET

London archaeologists have made quite a gruesome discovery.

Researchers found a 2,000-year-old cooking pot near the Walbrook river — and it was filled with human bones. The area had previously yielded 40 human skulls, but the new find adds another layer of intrigue to the mix. Archaeologists found the pot while excavating the site to make way for London's Crossrail Project, a new railway line in the city.

The site, known as Londinium in the Roman world, was the capital of a Roman province, Ancient Origins explains. The archaeologists suspect that the skulls belong to rebels who were slaughtered during the rebellion of the Celtic Queen Boudicca. Boudicca, queen of the Iceni tribe, led a revolt of British forces against the Roman empire in 60-61 C.E.

Before the cooking pot was discovered, historians believed the skulls had landed in the river bank accidentally, washed there from another civilization. But the new find suggests the skulls were placed there on purpose, since the bone-filled pot was no accident. The skulls also showed signs of trauma from weapons, suggesting they belonged to Romans who were killed by Boudicca's forces. Meghan DeMaria

Developing story
9:59 a.m. ET
Andrew Burton/Getty Images

Police arrested close to 200 people in Baltimore after a peaceful protest Monday over the death of Freddie Gray descended into violence and ultimately rioting.

Protesters set fire to 144 vehicles and 15 buildings, the city said Tuesday, with the escalating chaos prompting Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan (R) to declare a state of emergency and deploy 500 National Guard troops. At least 15 police officers were injured by protesters hurling bricks, bottles, and other objects.

"Too many people have spent generations building up this city for it to be destroyed by thugs," Baltimore Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake said.

The protests erupted hours after a funeral for Gray, the unarmed black man who died of a severe spinal injury while in police custody. Jon Terbush

Same-sex marriage
9:20 a.m. ET
Olivier Douliery/Getty Images

The Supreme Court on Tuesday will hear arguments concerning whether the Constitution guarantees a right to same-sex marriage, setting up what is expected to be a definitive ruling on the matter this summer.

The justices will consider two questions in the case: Whether states must issue marriage licenses to same-sex couples, and whether states must recognize same-sex marriages performed in other states. Known formally as Obergefell v. Hodges, the case involves four state-level bans on same-sex marriage — one each in Ohio, Kentucky, Michigan, and Tennessee — the justices consolidated into one comprehensive case.

Gay marriage is legal in 37 states and the District of Columbia. Jon Terbush

the lullaby of broadway
9:06 a.m. ET
Facebook.com/Tony Awards

At a press conference this morning, actors Bruce Willis and Mary-Louise Parker unveiled the nominees for the 69th annual Tony Awards, which honors the best of Broadway theater.

This year's top nominees are the musical An American in Paris, based on the 1951 Gene Kelly movie of the same name, and Fun Home, a musical adaptation of Alison Bechdel's 2006 graphic novel memoir. Both plays earned a total of 12 nominations, including Best Musical. Other top nominees include Something Rotten! (10 nominations), The King and I (9 nominations), and Wolf Hall Parts One and Two (8 nominations).

This year's acting categories feature a number of well-known nominees, including Bradley Cooper (The Elephant Man), Helen Mirren (The Audience), and Elisabeth Moss (The Heidi Chronicles).

Willis and Parker concluded the press conference by announcing this year's Tony hosts: Alan Cumming and Kristen Chenoweth, who is also nominated for Best Actress in a Musical for On the Twentieth Century.

The Tony Awards will air on CBS on June 7. For a full list of nominees, click over to the officials Tony Awards website. Scott Meslow

Baltimore
8:44 a.m. ET

In an interview with CBS This Morning on Tuesday, NAACP President and CEO Cornell William Brooks stressed that violence and riots won't change America's justice system.

"This is not merely one tragedy, but one in a series of tragedies, and there is much to be done that we have to pursue with vigor," Brooks said. "This problem won't be solved with Molotov cocktails. Burning businesses and homes and buildings in your own community is like putting a gun to your own head. And the fact of the matter is that rioting and looting doesn't represent flowers or a sympathy card to a grieving family. We've got to engage in constructive action."

Brooks also had the perfect answer when asked whether Baltimore's mayor should have called in the National Guard sooner. "It is a tragedy that is yet unfolding, and so second-guessing the mayor doesn't do anything to restore these buildings, or to console a grieving family, or to bring about healing to a broken and bruised community," Brooks said. Watch CBS' full interview with Brooks below. —Meghan DeMaria

explainers
8:17 a.m. ET
CC by: Jim Hood

There are an endless supply of articles about what to include in your résumé and what to leave out — in fact, there are whole books dedicated to the subject. But what about the font you use to put your professional life to paper? Bloomberg's Natalie Kitroeff spoke with "three typography wonks" to get their opinion, and they had a consensus choice: Helvetica (the font so classy it has an entire documentary dedicated to its san-serif glory).

Helvetica is safe, and it "feels professional, lighthearted, honest," designer Brian Hoff tells Bloomberg. If you want to stand out a bit, you can drop $30 (up to $734) to buy the font Proxima Nova, and if you insist on using serifs (the feet that adorn letters), go with Garamond or maybe Didot, the typography geeks suggest. Do not use Times New Roman.

"It's telegraphing that you didn't put any thought into the typeface that you selected," Hoff says. "It's like putting on sweatpants." For other suggestions and the font cognoscenti view on emojis (maybe!), read Kitroeff's dispatch at Bloomberg. Peter Weber

Baltimore
8:01 a.m. ET

Riots over the death of Freddie Gray, who died after suffering from injuries he received while in police custody, continued in Baltimore on Monday night. Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan (R) declared a state of emergency, and Baltimore Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake (D) imposed a mandatory curfew, starting Tuesday, from 10 p.m. to 5 a.m. At least 15 police officers were injured in clashes on Monday. Below are a few scenes from the riots and their aftermath. —Meghan DeMaria

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