FOLLOW THE WEEK ON FACEBOOK
On to the Next One
May 17, 2014

He's done it again.

California Chrome became just the 13th horse to win the first two legs of the Triple Crown since 1978, hanging on to a hard-fought lead to take the 139th Preakness Stakes victory.

With a prior Kentucky Derby victory and tonight's Preakness win, California Chrome and jockey Victor Espinoza look toward the mile-and-a-half at Belmont, the third and final "jewel" in the Triple Crown, which races on June 7.

"I hope okay," Espinoza said after tonight's race in regard to how he and the horse will handle Belmont. "You know what, we get it done."

Espinoza and California Chrome certainly got it done in Baltimore. Unlike at the Kentucky Derby, the pair pushed ahead of the pack immediately, tucking in with the leaders, only to be contested several times. As they tried to pull away on the final turn, Espinoza pushed his horse forward, too.

"I got more tired mentally than physically riding him," Espinoza said. "I sat back and…it worked out perfect. I thought it was a little too soon (to go), but you know what, I thought I had to go at that point."

This was 77-year-old trainer Art Sherman's first trip to Pimlico Race Course in Baltimore, Maryland. Sherman, along with owner Steve Coburn, are guiding a horse bred for just $10,000 toward a legendary season.

But remember: The best moments generally take place outside of the two minutes the horses race for glory. The Preakness was no different, with Mike Tyson tweeting out this bizarrely mashed-up photograph of him, along with an assortment of other big names in sports (that's Tom Brady to Tyson's left, and Kliff Kingsbury is the one peeking through the back). Oh, Maryland. --Sarah Eberspacher

Quotables
8:12 p.m. ET
Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images

On Monday, President Obama said the fight against the Islamic State is going to be a "generational struggle" that ultimately won't be "won or lost by the United States alone," but rather the "countries and communities that terrorists like [ISIS] target."

Obama made his remarks at the Pentagon following a briefing on the U.S. campaign against ISIS. "This broader challenge of countering violent extremism is not simply a military effort," he said. "Ideologies are not defeated by guns. They're defeated with better ideas — a more attractive and more compelling vision." The United States was on high alert over the 4th of July weekend amid warnings of possible attacks by ISIS, and Obama touched on the danger of terrorists who are able to operate under the radar. "The threat of lone wolves or small cells of terrorists is complex, it's harder to detect and harder to prevent," he said. "That means that we're going to have to pick up our game to prevent these attacks."

To combat ISIS online, Obama said the U.S. government plans to increase its efforts to counter propaganda it posts on social media sites, and will partner with Muslim communities who speak out again "the twisted thinking that draws vulnerable people" into the ranks of ISIS. He also called out the Senate for not confirming his nominee for undersecretary of the Treasury Department, Adam Szubin. Szubin was nominated in April, but there hasn't been a hearing or vote set yet. If confirmed, one of Szubin's roles would be cracking down on illegal funding to groups like ISIS, The Guardian reports. Catherine Garcia

RIP
7:09 p.m. ET
Jason Merritt/Getty Images

Jerry Weintraub, the producer behind the remake of Ocean's 11, The Karate Kid, and several other well-known films, died Monday in Palm Springs. He was 77.

Weintraub started off in the music business, serving as a tour promoter and manager for John Denver, Bob Dylan, Neil Diamond, and Led Zeppelin. In the 1970s, he transitioned to the movies, working with Robert Altman on Nashville. After a brief stint as head of United Artists, Weintraub founded the Weintraub Entertainment Group, which went bankrupt after three years.

More recently, he produced HBO's biodrama Behind the Candelabra; the documentary 41 on his friend, President George H.W. Bush; and the HBO series The Brink, which premiered in June. A Tarzan feature, starring Christoph Waltz and Samuel L. Jackson, is set for release in 2016. "I'm an entrepreneur, I've been an independent guy all my life," he told Variety in 2007. "I love doing what I do. I love the movies, I love actors, I love directors, I love writers, I love working with the studio, I love the marketing. I love the whole process." Weintraub is survived by his longtime girlfriend Susan Eakins, and children Michael, Julie, Jamie, and Jody. Catherine Garcia

crisis in yemen
6:44 p.m. ET

Air strikes across Yemen have killed close to 100 people, including several women and children, the Houthi-run state news agency said Monday.

In the Amran province, north of the capital, Sanaa, 54 people were killed, including 40 who were shopping at a market, Reuters reports. In southern Yemen, more than 40 people were killed during a strike on a livestock market in the town of al-Foyoush. Médecins Sans Frontières reports that hundreds of people have been entering medical facilities over the past several days, with Colette Gadenne, head of the mission, saying, "It is unacceptable that air strikes take place in highly concentrated civilian areas where people are gathering and going about their daily lives, especially at a time such as Ramadan."

The U.N. has called for a stop to the air strikes by the Saudi-led coalition, and special envoy to Yemen Ismail Ould Cheikh Ahmed spoke with Houthi forces to try to broker a humanitarian ceasefire. Last week, the UN designated the war a Level 3 humanitarian crisis, the most severe category. Since March, 3,000 people have been killed in the fighting. Catherine Garcia

This just in
5:37 p.m. ET
Steve & Marjorie Harvey Foundation/Getty Images

In a previously sealed document from a 2005 deposition, comedian Bill Cosby admitted to acquiring Quaaludes, which he said he intended to give to younger women he wanted to have sex with.

The admission came under oath, as part of a lawsuit filed by a former Temple University employee against Cosby. Cosby admitted to giving her three half-pills of Benadryl. The lawsuit was settled in 2006.

The Associated Press went to court in a successful petition for the release of the documents, which were publicly released on Monday afternoon. Cosby's lawyers unsuccessfully sought to keep the documents sealed, arguing that their release would "embarrass" Cosby. Scott Meslow

This just in
4:31 p.m. ET
Win McNamee/Getty Images

The South Carolina Senate on Monday voted 37-3 to remove the Confederate flag from the statehouse grounds in Columbus, The Associated Press reports. The Senate will still need to vote on the bill one more time Tuesday, though The New York Times reports it is "virtually assured of success" in the Senate. How the bill will fare in the House, however, still remains to be seen; it must also pass there before it can be signed into law by Gov. Nikki Haley.

South Carolinians began pushing for their state to remove the flag, considered by many to be a racist symbol, after a white gunman last month killed nine African-Americans attending a Bible study group in a historically black Charleston church. Samantha Rollins

This just in
3:53 p.m. ET
Handout/Getty Images

Less than two weeks after Boston Marathon bomber Dzhokhar Tsarnaev was formally sentenced to death for his role in the April 2013 bombing, he filed a preliminary motion for a new trial. Tsarnaev's lawyers are requesting a new trial for both his conviction and death sentence, saying a new trial is required "in the interests of justice." The motion is considered a placeholder for a more detailed one his lawyers will file next month, before Tsarnaev's post-trial action deadline of August 17.

Tsarnaev was convicted on 30 charges in May in relation to the bombing that killed three people and injured 264 others. Becca Stanek

Behold the future
3:38 p.m. ET

In 50 to 60 years, your wildest Dune-inspired dreams might just come true. That's because OXO, a French architecture company, is literally constructing a vertical city in the middle of the Earth's biggest desert, the Sahara. The plans call for the building to stand 1,476 feet high and contain approximately 84,000 square feet of residential and commercial areas, amid other livable spaces.

"The idea is to make a city out of this tower... The idea is to obtain a building combining different programs including housing units adjacent to offices of course. There is a museum, a meteorological observatory on the Sahara, there are libraries, gyms, pools. The idea was really to offer a sufficient number of programs to be able to remain self-sufficient and not to have to rely on other buildings or have to create new ones," architect Manal Rachdi told Reuters.

The vertical city will also function as its own "livable, green ecosystem," with a towering central garden irrigated by rainwater. Work on the building begins in 2025 (you can see the plans in the Reuters video below), and is expected to be completed over the course of 50 years. Now, would the future mind hurrying up? Jeva Lange

See More Speed Reads