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August 12, 2014

When we meet Jim, a 32-year-old obese man, in 2030, life is not going so well. In fact, we might be witnessing the beginning of Jim's end by cardiac arrest. As doctors rush to help his crushing heart, we backtrack through Jim's abbreviated lifespan to see how he got here.

What unfolds is first-person view of a sedentary, junk-food fueled life where bad habits are learned and encouraged by a well meaning family.

The video comes from Children's Healthcare of Atlanta's "Strong4Life" campaign, which encourages viewers to "rewind the future." It may not actually be too late for Jim, the PSA claims, and it's not too late for anyone else struggling to stay healthy, too.

Now, before you scratch the itch of cynicism, I encourage you to read the Reddit thread that plays out under the original posting. Strangers share stories, successes, failures, and the guilt and shame they feel in their plights. Such honesty is rewarded with sometimes aggressive words of support. One commentator threatens to check in on another's progress in a month. It is genuinely inspiring. Here are just a few examples:

I'm 5'9, 32 years old and almost 300 pounds. I played all those gaming systems and pretty much grew up like that. Even with the fucking treadmill.
I think for the first time, a psa got to me. See you soon progress pics (wish me luck reedit)
Edit: wow guys. Your going to make shed some tears with the support you are all giving me. I am not very articulate, but it's time like this I wish was so that I can properly deliver how much this support means to me. [Reddit user drewgarr]

**

Thanks for sharing, and for articulating it so clearly. I have lost weight over the last few months (30 lbs!), and just feel... so much better, more energetic, less achy, etc. Many habits I've gotten comfortable with needed to be broken, or still need breaking.
EDIT: Since this is a visible comment, THANK YOU to whoever gave me gold for posting the link!
EDIT2: I have read so many comments from people saying that this PSA inspired them to make changes to better their health, and that has overwhelmed me. Just know that if you're one of those people who's been inspired, yes, you can fucking do it. Also, /r/loseit and /r/progresspics genuinely motivated me, and maybe it will help you, too. [Reddit user StreetMailbox]

**

Wow. As an overweight mother this hit hard. I am doing everything in my power to make sure my daughter doesn't end up like me and so far it's working because she is a beautifully healthy little girl who would much rather take a slice of melon over chocolate I just need to sort myself out for her sake as well as my own. I can and will do it. I will not die through obesity. [Reddit user leedsfreak]

Obesity statistics are terrifying. Childhood obesity has more than doubled in children and quadrupled in adolescents on the past 30 years. If it takes a PSA or a public forum like Reddit to get the conversation and motivation going, more power to both.

Check out Strong4Life's website for more information about to make healthy habits. Lauren Hansen

Science!
11:27 a.m. ET
Johns Hopkins University

Amazon employees aren't the only people aiming to ship things quickly via drone. Doctors are testing out the technology, too.

A study published Wednesday in the journal PLOS One reports early findings that it might be possible for doctors to send blood samples to laboratories from remote clinics up to 30 miles away. They ran 56 blood samples from healthy patients through common tests doctors order and found that the drone samples were preserved just as well as the ones that hadn't been airborne, Pacific Standard reports.

The Johns Hopkins University researchers say the next step could be testing the practice in remote regions of Africa. They'll also need to ensure drone flights perform equally well with blood from sick patients. Julie Kliegman

Let's talk about sex
10:46 a.m. ET
Paul J. Richards/AFP/Getty Image

Rite Aid and Food Lion don't want minors in their store learning "25 Ways to Kiss a Naked Man," apparently. That is, you guessed it, a run-of-the-mill Cosmopolitan headline. The pharmacy and grocery chains announced Wednesday they'll shield minors from the horrors of sexual content by putting blinders on the magazine's cover, The New York Times reports.

The blinders will hide the cover's headlines, but not the magazine title or model. So not to worry, your kid can still gaze at barely naked women — he just can't read about them.

The move comes in response to a campaign against Hearst by the National Center on Sexual Exploitation, ironically started by William Randolph Hearst's own granddaughter, who does not have an official title at the company.

There's no word yet if other magazine-selling chain stores will follow suit. Meanwhile, the Times points out even racier covers routinely go unguarded. Sports Illustrated swimsuit edition, anyone? Julie Kliegman

Free trade
9:31 a.m. ET
Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images

The 12 Pacific Rim countries working in Hawaii to establish the biggest free trade deal in history failed to reach an agreement Friday, the end of their latest round of talks. The Trans-Pacific Partnership would cover 40 percent of the global economy.

Negotiators say significant progress was made, according to CNN, but there's no date set yet for the next round of talks. An agreement would lower trade barriers between the nations and encourage economic growth.

President Obama had all but ensured a deal would cruise through Congress, but with the 2016 presidential election on the horizon, if a deal is reached down the road, its fate would be less clear. Julie Kliegman

Fires
8:24 a.m. ET
Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Hundreds of people are fleeing their homes as more than a dozen large wildfires burned across drought-stricken Northern California on Saturday. Gov. Jerry Brown declared a state of emergency Friday.

About 8,000 firefighters are working to contain the fires, many caused by lightning strikes, according to the state Department of Forestry and Fire Protection. Most of the fires are at least 60 percent contained, but they have damaged tens of thousands of acres so far, CNN reports. One firefighter died Thursday battling the blazes.

The four-year drought has "turned much of the state into a tinderbox," Brown said. Julie Kliegman

Around the world
7:53 a.m. ET
Noorullah Shirzada/AFP/Getty Images

New Afghan Taliban leader Mullah Akhtar Mohammad Mansoor purportedly promised to continue the group's 14-year insurgency in audio released to journalists Saturday by a Taliban spokesman, The Associated Press reports.

"We should keep our unity, we must be united, our enemy will be happy in our separation," Mansoor purportedly said. "This is a big responsibly on us. This is not the work of one, two or three people. This is all our responsibility to carry on jihad until we establish the Islamic state."

The Afghan government announced Wednesday that the group's previous leader, Mullah Mohammad Omar, has been dead since April 2013. Julie Kliegman

E-disarmament
July 31, 2015

Does the right to bear arms apply to emoji arms? It's actually a somewhat serious question; activist nonprofit New Yorkers Against Gun Violence aims (excuse the pun) to disarm the iPhone by pressuring Apple's CEO to remove the gun icon from its emoji catalog.

"The iPhone is ubiquitous. [Guns are] on the iPhone as an option," the executive director of NYAGV, Leah Barrett, told Fast Company. "We thought this was a way to bring attention to the issue [of gun violence]."

The activists encourage people to tweet at Apple's CEO and ask for the gun emoji to be removed, using the hashtag #DisarmTheiPhone. However, Fast Company cautions, "If a company like Apple removes words from that language, even if they’re technically pictures, isn't it censorship? How far does this linguistic adjustment go? If we type the letters G-U-N should they be autocorrected to S-U-N, P-U-N, or F-U-N?" Well? Jeva Lange

For those who have everything
July 31, 2015
Courtesy Photo

"Not all baby carriers are made equally," said Bobby Bernstein at HiConsumption. The Mission Critical Baby Carrier ($190) was made with Gen Y fathers in mind, so it "has an urban assault tactical vibe to it." The San Francisco company that produces it offers a full line of matching dad gear, including a backpack, a messenger-style diaper bag, and modular accessories like an attachable baby-bottle holder. The tactical vest–style baby carrier straps on easily and has a hidden hood in its rear panel. All materials are military grade.
The Week Staff

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