Wait... what?
August 21, 2014
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In 1978, a 24-year-old pregnant woman from the central Indian state of Madhya Pradesh reportedly received the terrible news that she was suffering an ectopic pregnancy, in which the fetus grows outside the womb. The pregnancy did not go to term, just as doctors predicted, and the woman was told to have surgery to remove the fetus.

Fearing the prospect of going under the knife, the woman, according to the Times of India, sought treatment at a health center in her village instead. After a few months, the pain faded.

Recently, the now 60-year-old woman reported suffering consistent pain in her abdomen. Doctors detected a lump and ran her through several tests, which ultimately revealed that the mass was a child's skeleton. A team of surgeons from a hospital in Nagpur performed the rare procedure of removing the skeleton that had lived in the woman's body for 36 years.

If you're intrigued (and somewhat twisted), you can try to decipher the skeleton in the woman's CT scan, which is posted on the Daily Mail. Lauren Hansen

This just in
8:38 a.m. ET

France's chief public prosecutor has announced the country will pursue terrorism charges against Yassin Salhi, 35, the suspect accused of beheading his boss and attempting to blow up a gas plant last Friday. Salhi has claimed that the attack was unmotivated by his alleged connections to Islamist militants and instead the result of "personal problems," Reuters reports.

Last Friday, the head of Salhi's boss was discovered chained to a fence outside the plant and Islamist flags were also found at the site. Salhi is believed to have killed his boss during a delivery, then driven to the gas plant, where he was captured.

"Yassin Salhi beheaded his victim and pinned his head on the fence to seek maximum publicity for his act," Prosecutor Francois Molins said, citing similar executions performed by the Islamic State. Jeva Lange

Bush 3.0
8:34 a.m. ET
Scott Olson / Getty Images

On the final day of the fundraising quarter, Jeb Bush will reveal more than just how much money he's raised in his presidential campaign. He'll also offer the public a look into his personal finances. Bush's campaign confirmed Tuesday that the former Florida governor is poised to release 33 years of personal income tax returns, which Time reports is "a new record in American politics." Previous to Bush's upcoming release, former Sen. Bob Dole (R) held the record for his 1996 release of 30 years of tax returns.

Bush's release is intended to underscore his commitment to transparency. This will be the first time he has offered a glimpse into his finances in over a decade. Bush has since launched at least three private equity funds and joined multiple corporate boards — although he severed all official ties to them after entering the presidential race. Becca Stanek

Tunisian Beach Attacks
8:22 a.m. ET
Jeff J Mitchell / Getty Images

Friday's attack on a beach hotel in Tunisia is expected to spell big losses for the country's lucrative tourism sector. Tunisia anticipates that it will lose as much as a quarter of its yearly tourism earnings, which is at least $515 million, Reuters reports. The shooting in the popular tourist destination of Sousse left 39 people dead, most of them British tourists.

In Tunisia, the tourism sector accounts for about 7 percent of its gross domestic product. Last year, the country earned $1.95 billion in revenue from it. Now, the county is looking at ways to keep the industry afloat. Tunisian Tourism Minister Salma Loumi told reporters Monday that the government will likely offer debt relief for hotel owners and will no longer charge a visitor's tax. Friday's attack in Tunisia came just months after an attack at the Bardo museum in Tunis killed 21 people. Becca Stanek

This just in
8:13 a.m. ET
Milos Bicanski/Getty Images

Greek Finance Minister Yanis Varoufakis has confirmed that Greece will not pay back the 1.6 billion euros it owes to the International Monetary Fund by this evening's deadline. While the IMF does not use the term "default," the missed payment is effectively the equivalent. Greece is the IMF's biggest debtor, owing a total of 5.5 billion euros by the end of the year.

On Monday, Greek leaders closed the country's banks for six days and imposed limits on ATM withdrawals to prevent bank failures after talks to extend an international bailout collapsed. Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras has also called a July 5 referendum that will let Greeks vote on whether to accept the harsh financial reforms creditors are demanding. Standard & Poor's estimates there's a 50 percent chance the country will leave the eurozone. Jeva Lange

Leap Second
7:29 a.m. ET

We all get an extra second on Tuesday, thanks to a periodic recalibration of time due to a mismatch between our clocks and the Earth's rotation. "I know an extra second does not seem that big a deal," John Oliver said on Sunday's Last Week Tonight, "but you can get a lot done in a second." Or, you can waste it watching "some of the greatest 1-second videos you could possibly imagine," which is what Oliver is really offering. If you want to know how long until your extra second arrives, or just want to push the red button repeatedly to see what Last Week Tonight has on tap, visit SpendYourLeapSecondHere.com. Oliver offers a taste, and explains in greater detail, below. Peter Weber

campaign 2016
6:35 a.m. ET
Scott Olson/Getty Images

On Tuesday, New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie will formally announce his campaign for the Republican presidential nomination, and he'll do it from his old high school, Livingston High School in Livingston, New Jersey. The event is designed to re-introduce Christie to GOP primary voters, a year after his fortunes started tanking with a scandal about politically motivated bad traffic on the George Washington Bridge. Christie was popular in high school and president of his class for three years, The Associated Press reports.

Still, a high school gymnasium isn't a terribly grand venue for a presidential campaign launch, and that may be a reflection of Christie's reduced presidential prospects and campaign ambitions. Once a frontrunner, Christie is now relying on "a bank-shot strategy, a narrowly tailored approach that leaves Christie with little room for error," Politico reports, counting on gathering momentum by exceeding low expectations. Peter Weber

This is terrible
4:34 a.m. ET

On Tuesday morning, an Indonesian Hercules C-130 military transport plane crashed into a busy Medan neighborhood, just minutes after takeoff. At least 30 people died in the crash, Indonesian search-and-rescue official Hisar Turnip tells Reuters. "That's the latest information, the number could go up."

The plane, built in 1964 and carrying 12 people, circled over the neighborhood three times before crashing into a hotel and massage parlor, a hotel employee told Reuters. Medan, on the island of Sumatra, is Indonesia's third-largest city. You can see the immediate aftermath of the crash in the video below. Peter Weber

A video posted by Banjo (@banjoapp) on

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